The Top Kitchen Trends of 2021

With a significant amount of time spent inside over the last year, homeowners are more discerning when it comes to kitchen preferences. In fact, Houzz surveyed over 2,000 U.S. homeowners to see what projects they’re tackling in their kitchens this year. So, if you’re looking to revamp your kitchen, these ideas make the cut! 

COVID-19 Trends

Storage

94% of surveyed homeowners said storage was their priority. They’re expanding their storage by replacing their kitchen cabinets (63%). And those who did a partial cabinet upgrade (31%), almost 30% of them added cabinets to their newly renovated kitchen. This is four times the amount compared to last year! For those who partially replaced cabinets, the number one improvement was refinishing the exterior (60%), then adding cabinets (28%). 

Pantries

46% said they are adding or upgrading their pantry to include more space. This is up by 3%. There’s also an increase in walk-in panties by 3%. 

Changes in Open Layouts

Open-concept was a popular layout in the past, but it has decreased by 10% compared to 2019’s percentage of 53%. People are no longer wanting to renovate their open-floor plan by opening up their kitchen to other interior spaces. 

Outdoor Connection

One in 5 homeowners wants to open the kitchen to an outdoor space. 22% of homeowners are more open to outdoors, with the majority choosing to open via double doors or having a row of doors.  

Design

Backsplashes Extended

Homeowners are increasing their backsplash to include from the countertop all the way to the upper cabinets or range hood (68%). White is still the number one choice for a backsplash color (37%). Still, multicolored is second. 54% of homeowners chose ceramic or porcelain tiles are their preferred material. 

Flooring 

Ceramic or porcelain tile ranked number one for flooring (24%). Hardwood is second at 23%, and vinyl continues to grow in popularity at 19%, which is 6% higher than the previous year. The top flooring color for renovated kitchens was wood at 51%. The second place was gray (14%) and beige at third (10%). 

Island Cabinet Colors

Almost half of homeowners renovated their kitchen to have a different color island cabinet from the rest of the kitchen to make it pop (41%). The top color choices are blue and gray for their contrasting island cabinets. 

55% of homeowners chose to add an island or upgrade their current island. The popular layout choice is to add an island to create an L-shaped layout (38%). 

High Tech Faucets

Many homeowners want high technology in their kitchen, and a faucet is one of them. More than half of upgraded faucets have high-tech features. 26% claimed to be water-efficient, 22% said there’s a no-fingerprint coating, and 21% are touch-free activation. 

Neutral Colors

Gray, white, and beige colors continue to dominate in the kitchen. But a small percentage wants to mix it up by including blue walls (7%), gray flooring (14%), colorful backsplashes (18%), and black appliances (16%). 

Why They Remodeled

In this survey, Houzz also asked why they decided to remodel. The majority said they’ve wanted to do it all along, and now they finally have the means to do so (40%). 35% said they could no longer stand the old kitchen and 30% said their old kitchen was deteriorating or broken down. 28% said they wanted to personalize their newly purchased home, and 14% were inspired to change certain items. 

The most popular renovation was countertops at 88%. The second was backsplash at 83%, and the third is 80%. Other popular renovations were faucets (78%), light fixtures (74%), flooring (65%), all appliances (51%), wall finish (46%), some appliances (33%), windows (28%), exterior doors (19%), interior doors (17%), and electronics (10%). Upgrades to light fixtures, appliances, wall finishes, and interior doors decreased compared to last year. 

When changing the kitchen layout, 44% opted to change the kitchen layout: 38% and 34% upgraded systems and modified walls. Al little more than two-thirds kept their kitchen the same size, where almost 30% opted for larger. Over a quarter opted to make it up 50% larger, and 7% chose more than 50%. 200 square feet or more accounted for the renovated kitchen’s final size for 51% of homeowners. 

After their kitchen renovations, 97% reported their number one activity is cooking. Dining and eating are second at 70%, a tie with 2020’s percentage. Third place was baking at 69% (remember all the bread we baked at the beginning of 2020?). Besides cooking and baking, the top activities after their kitchen renovation were eating and dining (52%) and entertaining (50%).  

As we can see from the data, homeowners want a space with a closed layout to personalize. If you need help deciding what home designs increase your rental property’s ROI, reach out to TALK Property Management– We are here to help: (512) 721-1094 or dbrown@talkpropertymanagement.com.

 

4 Timely Home Design Trends for Rental Property in 2021

If 2021 is the year you become an investor, or if you’re already one and looking for ways to increase ROI on your investment, these four home designs should factor into your portfolio decisions in 2021. With the pandemic, people are spending significantly more time at home, and this influences home layout preferences and needs. Here are some home design trends you should look for in your next rental property.

Separated Spaces for Multigen

Open floor plans are not as popular if multiple people are sharing the same living space. Homeowners are looking for areas to do work, place video calls, exercise, and learn remotely, and you can’t do that all in one room. Think of the chaos! This is especially true with the rise in multigenerational families sharing a home, where each individual needs space and privacy for themselves. 

Wood-grain Elements in the Kitchen

Increased time spent indoors is influencing home materials. Homeowners are craving the outdoors indoors, and this includes materials that are organic and natural. This home design ties interior elements to nature and can be accomplished by adding wood-grain cabinets and wood countertops. 

Outdoor Solitude

The backyard has become a break room of sorts for adults and children, so homeowners are looking for entertainment. The items that gained popularity during the pandemic are fireplaces, fire pits, patios and decks, screened-in porches, and outdoor kitchens. While an outdoor kitchen can be expensive, it can be as economical as adding an outdoor refrigerators and dining areas to your rental property

Smarter Bathrooms 

Touchless appliances and self-cleaning appliances gained traction last year in smart technology. Motion sensors for lighting and smart temperature control for bathroom floors are some ideas that can increase ROI.

 

Contact us today to begin your investor journey. If you need help deciding what home designs increase your rental property’s ROI, reach out to TALK Property Management– We are here to help: (512) 721-1094 or dbrown@talkpropertymanagement.com.

Part One: Should I Rent Out My Home Instead of Selling?

Selling or renting is the age-old question for property owners, and there is no right or wrong answer. Let’s look at what the market is doing now and then discuss factors to consider to make the best choice for your situation. 

The Market Now

The Central Texas housing market continues to be strong for many reasons, including our high quality of life, relatively low cost of living, and even the coronavirus pandemic. 

COVID-19 has altered the way we search for homes, show homes, and buy and sell homes. It has also kept some local home sellers out of the market–those who don’t “have to” move–likely because they’re waiting for the effects of the pandemic to dwindle. That means that local demand for housing outweighs supply, so homes are selling for a higher price. This process is called a seller’s market. But, the real estate market is dynamic, and this could change at any time.

Additionally, mortgage interest rates remain at historic lows, motivating buyers to make a purchase now.

The local and national economies impact the housing market as well, so you’ll need to assess items that can increase or decrease city growth. People could be relocating for jobs, which can cause job losses and increases. Are businesses moving into the area? Are houses being fixed or abandoned? Each aspect will help you get a better understanding of where the market and economy are going. 

Lastly, rent prices have increased over the years, with an increase in Millennials and Baby Boomers demanding affordable rental housing. But, this is a trend that could change now due to the economy. 

What to Consider

Do you want to be a landlord?

Managing a property is a time consuming and challenging job. Consider if you have a team to help you, like a handyman or real estate agent, or do you need to hire them? Ask yourself if you have the time and effort to screen tenants or if you’re willing to hire a third party to do so. 

It’s essential to factor in where you’ll be living. If you’re out of state, you’ll need a property manager. If you’re staying local, then you need to know what that requires. Not only will you need the time, effort, and cash to be a landlord, you’ll need to be knowledgeable in the local, state, and fair housing laws. 

Read my owner’s resource for “5 Things You Should Know Before Becoming a Landlord”.

 

Are you buying another property while renting the other?

To get a second mortgage, lenders will consider rental income, usually up to 75%, to be counted as income sources. But, with low mortgage interest rates, this might be the time to refinance and pay an even lower mortgage payment. 

 

Will home values increase in your area?

While it’s impossible to predict the market, it’s smart to follow it to see where your home’s value could be in a few years. Suppose you expect the market to work in your favor in a few years and increase the value. In that case, you might want to consider renting it now and selling later to take advantage of the appreciation. Conversely, if you think this is the best the market will do for your house, then sell now. 

To calculate the potential return on your investment property, you’ll need to know your cash flow and equity. To read an example, read my investor resource “How to Calculate the Potential Return on Your Investment Property.” 

A cost market analysis (CMA) will help you answer what your house is worth right now. It will also help you understand the current housing market and the price of other similar properties. Get a full CMS explanation here.   

 

This is part one of a two-part series. In the next blog, I’ll share the specific costs of renting and selling. Check back in December for part 2!